Books We Love

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All of the titles below link to amazon.com through affiliated links.

{Parenting Books}

New Baby

Dear Parent: Caring for Infants with Respect by Magdar Gerber
Internationally renowned infant specialist Magda Gerber, M.D., the founder of RIE, offers a healthy new approach to infant care based on a profound respect for each baby’s individual needs and abilities. Gerber’s philosophy, known as Educaring®, evolved from the works of distinguished pediatrician Emmi Pikler, who realized half a century ago that babies are not “helpless bundles, ” but true human beings with individual skills and personalities. Magda Gerber Uses this core idea as the basis of her theory that a baby’s motor skills and coping skills are best learned from his/her own inner resources. The baby’s other skills, such as social, emotional and language skills, are best learned with a parent’s help. Dear Parent helps parents learn the difference between the two so they know when and how to help their developing infants and when to let babies learn for themselves. Short chapters make it easy to read and find information about life with newborns and later developmental stages of infancy.

The Aware Baby by Aletha J. Solter, PhD
The Aware Baby marks a major breakthrough in our understanding of babies’ needs from conception to 2½ years of age. This revised edition includes new research and insights from the author’s extensive experience as a consultant and international workshop leader. The author discusses the attachment needs of infants, which are best met by close physical contact, breast-feeding, and prompt responsiveness to crying. At the core of her philosophy is the concept of crying as tension release, with the emphasis that babies should always be held when they cry.

This book will teach you how to:

-Bond with your infant.
-Respond to your baby’s crying.
-Enhance your baby’s intelligence.
-Help your baby sleep better.
-Find alternatives to punishment.
-Raise your child to be nonviolent.


The Baby Book
by Dr. Bob Sears
In this perennially best-selling and encyclopaedic guide, Dr. Bill and Martha Sears draw from their vast experience as both medical professionals and parents to provide authoritative, comprehensive information on every aspect of infant care. needs of babies — eating, sleeping, development, health, and comfort — as it addresses the questions of greatest concern to parents today. The topics covered include: – getting your baby to sleep – understanding your baby’s development – treating common illnesses – baby proofing your home – toddler behaviour – dealing with temper tantrums – toilet training – working and parenting – and much more reflects the way we live today. The Searses acknowledge that there is no one best way to parent a baby, and they offer the basic guidance and inspiration you need to develop the parenting style that best suits you and your child. most out of parenting — for your child, for yourself, and for your entire family.

Ages 0+

Touchpoints: The Essential Reference by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.
All over the U.S. and in over twenty countries around the world, Touchpoints has become required reading for anxious parents of babies and small children. T. Berry Brazelton’s great empathy for the universal concerns of parenthood, and honesty about the complex feelings it engenders, as well as his uncanny insight into the predictable leaps and regressions of early childhood, have comforted and supported families since its publication in 1992. In this completely revised edition Dr. Brazelton introduces new information on physical, emotional, and behavioral development. He also addresses the new stresses on families and fears of children, with a fresh focus on the role of fathers and other caregivers. This updated volume also offers new insights on prematurity, sleep patterns, early communication, toilet training, co-sleeping, play and learning, SIDS, cognitive development and signs of developmental delay, childcare, asthma, a child’s immune system, and safety. Dr. Sparrow, Brazelton’s co-author on several other books, brings a child psychiatrist’s insights into the many perennial childhood issues covered in this comprehensive book. No parent should be without the reassurance and wisdom Touchpoints provides.

The No-Cry Sleep Solution: Gentle Ways to Help Your Baby Sleep Through the Night by Elizabeth Pantley
There are two schools of thought for encouraging babies to sleep through the night: the hotly debated Ferber technique of letting the baby “cry it out,” or the grin-and-bear-it solution of getting up from dusk to dawn as often as necessary. If you don’t believe in letting your baby cry it out, but desperately want to sleep, there is now a third option, presented in Elizabeth Pantley’s sanity-saving book The No-Cry Sleep Solution.

1,2,3…The Toddler Years: A Practical Guide for Parents and Caregivers by Irene Van der Zande
1,2,3…The Toddler Years offers practical help in an entertaining fashion on the many issues parents and caregivers face as young children experience the toddler years. The true life examples, humorous approach and clear format make the book easy to read and use. These methods have been applied successfully for over 30 years by the Santa Cruz Toddler Care Center, which has built its program around the belief that what young children learn about themselves and their world during their toddler years will affect the rest of their lives.

Your One-Year-Old: The Fun-Loving, Fussy 12-To 24-Month-Old by Louise Bates Ames
In this first book in the series from the renowned Gesell Institute, which includes Your One-Year-Oldthrough Your Ten- to Fourteen-Year-Old, the authors discuss all important questions that concern the twelve- to twenty-four-month-old child. They examine the various stages of development between infancy and toddlerhood: what new things the child can do; how the child acts with parents and other people; what the child thinks and feels.

Your Two-Year-Old: Terrible or Tender by Louise Bates Ames
What are two-year-old girls and boys thinking and feeling? How do they see others around them? With humor and compassion, the authors describe the general characteristics of these complex toddlers: their physical growth trends, their emotional and psychological maturation. Also included are insights into how two-year-olds behave with family and other children, and advice on how to handle them, as well as tings to avoid.

Parenting from the Inside Out by Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., and Mary Hartzell, M.Ed.
In Parenting from the Inside Out, child psychiatrist Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., and early childhood expert Mary Hartzell, M.Ed., explore the extent to which our childhood experiences shape the way we parent. Drawing on stunning new findings in neurobiology and attachment research, they explain how interpersonal relationships directly impact the development of the brain, and offer parents a step-by-step approach to forming a deeper understanding of their own life stories, which will help them raise compassionate and resilient children. Born out of a series of parents’ workshops that combined Siegel’s cutting-edge research on how communication impacts brain development with Hartzell’s decades of experience as a child-development specialist and parent educator, this book guides parents through creating the necessary foundations for loving and secure relationships with their children.

Your Three-Year-Old: Friend or Enemy by Louise Bates Ames
A three-year-old is a real puzzle to parents, sometimes anxious to please and befriend, sometimes strong-willed and difficult to get along with. At the heart of the three-year-old’s personality is often an emotional insecurity—and this causes a host of problems for parents! Drs. Ames and Ilg, recognized authorities on child behavior and development, help parents understand what’s going on inside that three-year-old head, what problems children have, and how to cope with the toddler who is sometimes friend, sometimes enemy.

Your Four-Year-Old: Wild and Wonderful by Louise Bates Ames
What is it about four-year-olds that makes them  so lovable? What problems do four-year-olds have?  What can they do now that they couldn’t do at  three? Drs. Ames and Ilg, recognized authorities on  child behavior and development, discuss these and  scores of other questions unique to four-year-old  girls and boys, and they offer parents practical  advice and enlightening psychological insights.

Your Five-Year-Old: Sunny and Serene by Louise Bates Ames
A five-year-old is a wonderful, fun-loving, exuberant child. But what’s going on inside that five-year-old head? What stages of development does a child this age go through, and what should parents know that can help their five-year-old handle this impressionable year? Recognized authorities on child behavior and development, Drs. Ames and Ilg answer these and many other questions, offering both invaluable practical advice and enlightening psychological insights.

Between Parent and Child by Dr. Haim Ginott
Based on the theory that parenting is a skill that can be learned, this indispensable handbook will show you how to:
• Discipline without threats, bribes, sarcasm, and punishment
• Criticize without demeaning, praise without judging, and express anger without hurting
• Acknowledge rather than argue with children’s feelings, perceptions, and opinions
• Respond so that children will learn to trust and develop self-confidence

How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber
This bestselling classic includes fresh insights and suggestions as well as the author’s time-tested methods to solve common problems and build foundations for lasting relationships, including innovative ways to:
·      Cope with your child’s negative feelings, such as frustration, anger, and disappointment
·      Express your strong feelings without being hurtful
·      Engage your child’s willing cooperation
·      Set firm limits and maintain goodwill
·      Use alternatives to punishment that promote self-discipline
·      Understand the difference between helpful and unhelpful praise
·      Resolve family conflicts peacefully
Enthusiastically praised by parents and professionals around the world, the down-to-earth, respectful approach of Faber and Mazlish makes relationships with children of all ages less stressful and more rewarding.

Siblings Without Rivalry: How to Help Your Children Live Together So You Can Live Too by Adele Faber
This wise, groundbreaking book gives parents the practical tools they need to cope with conflict, encourage cooperation, reduce competition, and make it possible for children to experience the joys of their special relationship. With humor and understanding—much gained from raising their own children—Faber and Mazlish explain how and when to intervene in fights, provide suggestions on how to help children channel their hostility into creative outlets, and demonstrate how to treat children unequally and still be fair. Updated to incorporate fresh thoughts after years of conducting workshops for parents and professionals, this edition also includes a new afterword.

Playful Parenting by Lawrence J. Cohen, PhD
Have you ever stepped back to watch what really goes on when your children play? As psychologist Lawrence J. Cohen points out, play is children’s way of exploring the world, communicating deep feelings, getting close to those they care about, working through stressful situations, and simply blowing off steam. That’s why “playful parenting” is so important and so successful in building strong, close bonds between parents and children. Through play we join our kids in their world–and help them to

• Express and understand complex emotions
• Break through shyness, anger, and fear
• Empower themselves and respect diversity
• Play their way through sibling rivalry
• Cooperate without power struggles

From eliciting a giggle during baby’s first game of peekaboo to cracking jokes with a teenager while hanging out at the mall, Playful Parenting is a complete guide to using play to raise confident children. Written with love and humor, brimming with good advice and revealing anecdotes, and grounded in the latest research, this book will make you laugh even as it makes you wise in the ways of being an effective, enthusiastic parent.

The Attachment Connection by Ruth Newton, PhD. and Allen Schore
The Attachment Connection sorts out the facts from the fiction about parent-child attachment and shows how paying attention to the emotional needs of your child, particularly during the first five years of development, can help him or her grow up happy, secure, and confident. You’ll discover how your child’s brain is developing at each stage of growth and learn to use reasonable, easy-to-implement guidelines based on sound science to foster secure attachment, healthy social skills, and emotional regulation in your child.

The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson
The Whole Brain Child offers a revolutionary approach to child rearing with twelve key strategies that foster healthy brain development, leading to calmer, happier children. The authors explain—and make accessible—the new science of how a child’s brain is wired and how it matures. The “upstairs brain,” which makes decisions and balances emotions, is under construction until the mid-twenties. And especially in young children, the right brain and its emotions tend to rule over the logic of the left brain. No wonder kids throw tantrums, fight, or sulk in silence. By applying these discoveries to everyday parenting, you can turn any outburst, argument, or fear into a chance to integrate your child’s brain and foster vital growth.

The Secure Child: Helping our Children Feel Safe and Confiedent in a Changing World by Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D.
In the wake of the events of September 11th, families have drawn closer together, recognizing the comfort that can be drawn from those we treasure most. But how do we help children feel secure longterm? And how can we recognize the signs of distress or anxiety in their behavior that tell us that they need our help?In The Secure Child, Dr. Stanley Greenspan offers a set of guiding principles that will help parents of children at each age–from preschoolers to teenagers –both reassure and guide them so that they feel secure in their homes, their schools, and in their community at large. In addition. Greenspan illuminates the often subtle shifts in children’s behavior that signal reaction to the current stress and fears and gives parents concrete suggestions to help children handle their anxieties and look to the future with confidence and optimism. From showing parents how to allow children to talk about their feelings to giving them concrete ways to contribute to national healing efforts, this profoundly wise book will help families everywhere move towards the common goal of a more stable and secure future.

The Opposite of Worry: The Playful Parenting Approach to Childhood Anxieties and Fears by Lawerence J. Cohen, PhD
Whether it’s the monster in the closet or the fear that arises from new social situations, school, or sports, anxiety can be especially challenging and maddening for children. And since anxiety has a mind of its own, logic and reassurance often fail, leaving parents increasingly frustrated about how to help. Now Lawrence J. Cohen, Ph.D., the author of Playful Parenting, provides a special set of tools to handle childhood anxiety. Offering simple, effective strategies that build connection through fun, play, and empathy, Dr. Cohen helps parents

• start from a place of warmth, compassion, and understanding
• teach children the basics of the body’s “security system”: alert, alarm, assessment, and all clear.
• promote tolerance of uncertainty and discomfort by finding the balance between outright avoidance and “white-knuckling” through a fear
• find lighthearted ways to release tension in the moment, labeling stressful emotions on a child-friendly scale
• tackle their own anxieties so they can stay calm when a child is distressed
• bring children out of their anxious thoughts and into their bodies by using relaxation, breathing, writing, drawing, and playful roughhousing

With this insightful resource of easy-to-implement solutions and strategies, you and your child can experience the opposite of worry, anxiety, and fear and embrace connection, trust, and joy.

{Emotional Care Books}

Anxiety:

Dropping the Baby and Other Scary Thoughts: Breaking the Cycle of Unwanted Thoughts in Motherhood
 by Karen Kleiman, MSW and Amy Wenzel, PhD
What if I drop my baby when I go down the steps? What if I burn the baby in the bathtub? Thoughts like these can be frightening to new mothers, but are a common symptom pregnant and postpartum women can experience. Dropping the Baby and Other Scary Thoughts: Breaking the Cycle of Unwanted Thoughts in Motherhood addresses the nature of these intrusive, negative and unwanted thoughts. Kleiman and Wenzel offer answers to the women who seek information, clarification, and validation in this useful resource for healthcare professionals working with these mothers. Written by two clinicians who have established themselves as leading experts and authors in this specialized field, this book maintains a compassionate tone that will be a voice familiar to many women in the postpartum community. Whether you must confront these negative notions personally or in your practice, this book will explain what these thoughts are, why they are there, and what can be done about them.

 

The Pregnancy and Postpartum Anxiety Workbook: Practical Skills to Help You Overcome Anxiety, Worry, Panic Attacks, Obsessions, and Compulsions 
by Kevin Gyoerkoe Psy.D. ACT, Pamela Wiegartz Ph.D. ACT, Laura Miller MD
If these thoughts seem to be permanent fixtures in your mind, you’re in good company. New moms have a lot to be anxious about, and it’s perfectly natural to have some fears during and after pregnancy. The problem is, anxiety can grow, disrupting your daily life and keeping you from enjoying motherhood. The Pregnancy and Postpartum Anxiety Workbook provides proven-effective strategies drawn from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for keeping anxious thoughts at bay and getting back to the productive and positive thinking you’ve been missing.

Through a series of easy exercises and worksheets, you’ll learn skills for relaxing yourself when you feel stressed. You’ll also learn to reduce the frequency and intensity of anxious feelings many pregnant women and mothers of infants face. The book also includes a chapter that offers tips to help fathers understand and support their partners.

Depression:

This Isn’t What I Expected: Overcoming Postpartum Depression 
by Karen Kleiman and Valerie Raskin
A major addition to both maternity and psychology literature, here is a guide to self-help and professional treatment of postpartum depression–one of the most misunderstood and misdiagnosed mental illnesses. The authors debunk the myths surrounding PPD and provide compassionate support and solid advice for women with PPD.

Beyond the Blues: Understanding and Treating Prenatal and Postpartum Depression & Anxiety 
by Pec Indman & Shoshanna Bennett

This 150-page book is packed with the information you will need to understand postpartum depression and anxiety, how to reach out for help, and what family members can do to help. Written by Shoshana Bennett, Ph.D., a former president of Postpartum Support International, and Pec Indman Ed.D and MFT, this book is sensitive to the specific difficulties families face in the postpartum period.

Tokens of Affection: Reclaiming your Marriage After Postpartum Depression 
by Karen Kleiman
Postpartum depression is hard on a marriage. In their private practices, authors Karen Kleiman and Amy Wenzel often find themselves face-to-face with marriages that are suffocating, as if the depression has sucked the life out of a relationship that was only prepared for the anticipated joy of pending childbirth. What happens to marriage? Why do couples become angry, isolated, and disconnected? Tokens of Affection looks closely at marriages that have withstood the passing storm of depression and are now seeking, or in need of, direction back to their previous levels of functioning and connectedness. The reader is introduced to a model of collaboration that refers to 8 specific features, which guide postpartum couples back from depression. These features, framed as “Tokens,” are based on marital therapy literature and serve as a reminder that these are not just communication skill-building techniques; they are gift-giving gestures on behalf of their relationship. A reparative resource, Tokens of Affectionhelps couples find renewed harmony, a solid relational ground, and reconnection.

What Am I Thinking?: Having a Baby After Postpartum Depression 
by Karen Kleiman
For many women, having a baby delivers all the profound joy they anticipated and brings happiness beyond description. For women who experience depression after the birth of a baby, this joy can seem elusive. Instead, women with postpartum depression (PPD) are often gripped with feelings of deep sadness, confusion, anxiety, and despair, and they are deprived of their anticipated joy in their first precious months with their baby. At some point, the question of having another baby arises. If you ask a woman in the throes of a depression this question, she may say, no. No more children. If you ask a woman who has recovered from postpartum depression if she wants more children, she may say, yes, but I’m scared to go through that again. This book was written to accompany these women on their journey toward a subsequent pregnancy after postpartum depression. What Am I Thinking contains essential information for a woman and her family who plan on having another baby after a previous experience with postpartum depression. As these women know, planning another pregnancy can be a process filled with profound anxiety, indecision, fears, and self-doubt. What if I get depressed again? What if it’s worse this next time? What if something terrible happens? What if I’m making a mistake? Filled with self-help strategies, current treatment recommendations, and practical advice, this book offers women the hope, confidence, and support they need to make this journey in spite of their anxiety. With this resource and available knowledge in hand, they are likely to feel more empowered, enabling them to proceed with confidence.

A Deeper Shade of Blue: A Woman’s Guide to Recognizing and Treating Depression in Her Childbearing Years 
by Ruta Nonacs
Depression affects women almost twice as often as men, with about one in four women suffering from it at some point in her lifetime. While depression may strike at any time, studies show that women appear to be particularly vulnerable during their childbearing years. This comprehensive and empathetic book confronts the seldom-talked-about issue of pregnancy-related depression, identifying symptoms, treatments, and cures for this constellation of serious, underdiagnosed, and surprisingly common
emotional conditions.

Topics covered include the emotional repercussions of infertility and miscarriage, depression during pregnancy, postpartum depression and anxiety, and the impact of maternal depression on spouse and family. Also addressed are the many aspects of a woman’s life — career, education, marriage, and a host of other factors — that may increase her stress during the span of her childbearing years and make her especially susceptible to emotional difficulties.

Straightforward, honest, and sensitive, A Deeper Shade of Blue speaks directly to women at risk of or suffering from depression within the context of childbearing and provides the information they need to get the best care, during pregnancy and beyond.

For Fathers:

The Postpartum Husband: Practical Solutions for Living with Postpartum Depression 
by Karen Kleiman
For too many families, the postpartum period brings unexpected pain and devastation when depression entered the picture. The anticipated joy and pleasure of parenthood is replaced with feelings of fear, sadness, anger, confusion and resentment.

Research has shown that supportive relationships during postpartum depression treatment is associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms.  When partners have the right information, they will not only gain a better understanding of the illness and its impact, they will also feel better themselves.  Furthermore, we know that this understanding and capacity for support is directly related to his wife’s sense of well being and control.  In my first book, “This Isn’t What I Expected: Overcoming Postpartum Depression” (Bantam, 1994), we included a chapter for husbands, which turned out to be an invaluable resource for the partners of women suffering from PPD.  After receiving feedback from the families I treat, I was shown that husbands needed support and information that is distinct from what their wives were seeking.  “The Postpartum Husband” offers that information with its handy reference-style format and addresses specific questions that may arise throughout the course of the illness.  As the husband feels more in control of the situation and his wife feels understood and cared for, symptoms improve and recovery is augmented.

 

Medication:

When Words Are Not Enough: The women’s prescription for depression and anxiety 
by Valerie Raskin
One in four women will experience clinical depression, anxiety, or premenstrual depression in her lifetime. The good news is that popular new prescription drugs like  Prozac and Xanax bring much needed relief. The bad news is that many physicians and therapists are unaware of common issues for women. As medical treatment for depression and anxiety has become simpler, more and more general practitioners are prescribing antidepressants, often with little background in the nonmedical alternatives or complex mind-body interactions.

Emphasizing women’s family roles as well as their unique biological/hormonal sensitivities, Dr. Raskin explains contemporary integrated treatment options. Raskin pays special attention to how birth control, menstrual cycles, childbearing, and menopause impact treatment choices. Raskin empowers women to take an active approach in dealing with common side effects, including weight gain and diminished sexual responsiveness. Using revealing case studies, Raskin offers a wealth of hands-on advice.

At a time when trends in health care have led to less personalized contact between doctor and patient, When Words Are Not Enough provides the facts and reassurance women need to be in control of their own health.

Medications and Mother’s Milk: A Manual of Lactational Pharmacology
 by Thomas Hale
Now in its 16th Edition, Medications and Mothers’ Milk, is the worldwide best selling drug reference on the use of medications in breastfeeding mothers. This book provides you with the most current, complete, and easy-to-read information on using medications in breastfeeding mothers. This massive new update has hundreds of new drugs, diseases, vaccines, and syndromes. It also contains numerous new tables, and changes to hundreds of existing drugs. Written by a world-renown clinical pharmacologist, Dr. Thomas Hale, this drug reference provides includes everything that is known about the transfer of various medications into human milk, and the use of radiopharmaceuticals, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and vaccines in breastfeeding mothers. This new and expanded reference has data on more than 1,300 drugs, syndromes, vaccines, herbals, and many other substances. The appendices are full of information on radioactive drugs and tests, over-the-counter drugs, and much more. New to this Edition: More than 200 new drugs, vaccines, herbals, and chemicals. It includes major updates to many existing drugs and other substances. It provides new data on close contact restrictions following radioisotope use. It also includes many new radiocontrast agents and updated tables on birth control medications.

Postpartum Psychosis:

Understanding Postpartum Psychosis: A Temporary Madness 
by Teresa M. Twomey
Offering an understanding of postpartum psychosis, this riveting book explains what happens and why during this temporary and dangerous disorder that develops for some women rapidly after childbirth. Most of us are familiar with the baby blues, a passing sadness that strikes 50 to 75 percent of new mothers after delivery. And most of us understand postpartum depression, a sadness post-delivery that lingers for weeks or months for an estimated one in every 10 new mothers. But a more serious form of disorder that strikes up to one in every 500 is postpartum psychosis – triggering severe agitation, confusion, insomnia, hallucinations, delusions, mania, and possible thoughts of suicide or murder. Every year, women in the United States and around the world kill their babies, children, and themselves as a result of this mental illness. Here, author Twomey, an official with Postpartum Support International, gives us insight into the psychological, personal, medical, legal, and historical perspectives on this little-understood mental illness, which is both preventable and treatable.

While most women who suffer postpartum psychosis eventually recover without harming anyone, they most often do so in silence. Paranoia is a common symptom, explains Twomey, and that moves women to hide their symptoms from everyone around them. The woman can hence appear normal, but be putting both herself and her baby at risk. We can prevent and treat this, but we need to recognize it by better screening of women postpartum, says Twomey.